Education Plus
CCIM to crack the whip on dummy students, teachers in ayurveda colleges
Nov 22, 2012 12:59 PM , By Special Correspondent
CRACKDOWN: Vedprakash Tyagi, president, Central Council for Indian Medicine, inaugurating the decennial celebrations of the Karnataka Ayurvedic Medical College in Mangalore on Wednesday. Photo: H.S. Manjunath
CRACKDOWN: Vedprakash Tyagi, president, Central Council for Indian Medicine, inaugurating the decennial celebrations of the Karnataka Ayurvedic Medical College in Mangalore on Wednesday. Photo: H.S. Manjunath

Universities offering courses in ayurveda medicine will be de-recognised and admissions made by them will be cancelled on the spot if they are found to have “on paper” teachers and students, said Vedprakash Tyagi, president, Central Council for Indian Medicine (CCIM).

He was speaking as chief guest at the decennial celebrations of the Karnataka Ayurvedic Medical College (KAMC) held in the city on Wednesday.

Anyone who has complaints against such teachers or students in ayurveda colleges might contact him through the website of CCIM (www.ccim.org), he said.

Dr. Tyagi said that 85 colleges had been closed down as they were not abiding by the regulations laid down by the Government of India and against the council.

He said that the examinations for ayurveda courses would be completed within 10 days and the results announced within the next 10 days. The change had been made because earlier the examinations (theory and practical) were held over 18 days and the results took time to be declared. The syllabus had been modified, he said.

There were 68 emergency medicines used in allopathy that could be prescribed by ayurveda doctors soon. “But when the Government of India is about to give these medicines to ayurveda doctors, it becomes the ethical responsibility of the latter to double the number of medicines.”

Knowledge about allopathy and ayurveda must be exchanged by doctors who practise the two. “All systems of medicine have to co-exist for the health of all people,” he said.

Attavar Muralidhar, principal, KAMC, said that six ayurveda colleges including those in Moodbidri, Koppa, Sullia, and Mangalore were committed to make changes in the study of ayurveda including the curriculum.

Jayaprakash Narayan, consultant ayurveda physician, said that students of ayurveda were not confident about practising despite studying for eight years.

To rectify this challenge, a 10-day residential course called “Sadhanam” has been started, he said.


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